Nevada SCBWI

Society of Children's Book Writers and Illustrators

New Illustrator Project: Bringing The Animal Out In Your Main Character

Hello Everyone.

 

Illustrators, since you're here, you've probably already had an opportunity to view the project outlined below. But, I thought it would be good to post it here so we can do our best to be in keeping with the projected schedule.

 

Since this is a new venue, not set up quite like a discussion board, in an attempt to keep your critiques specific to your work, we would like you to post a blog for your critiques. This way, we will be sure the input you see, will be to your work specifically. Posting a blog for the first part of the project "Brainstorming" won't be necessary. But, when you have rendered works that will be up for critique, we ask that you create a blog entry with your name and the stage of the project you are working on.

 

Thank you so much for joining us.

 

 

BRINGING THE ANIMAL OUT IN YOUR MAIN CHARACTER (MC)

 

Illustrators take artistic license on occasion. It’s been told that an author has written a story about their dear nieces or nephews and when it was turned over to an illustrator, the writer was surprised to find that their dearly beloved family member was turned into an anthropomorphic character by the artist who decided to render him/her as an animal. (As an Author/Illustrator, Ian Falconer decided to render his very own niece, Olivia, as a pig). http://www.kidsreads.com/authors/au-falconer-ian.asp

 

Our next project was developed with the intention of empowering illustrators to take artistic license, stretch themselves by taking the human characters of their selected story and bring the animals out in them. This time we are offering two options. Some of you may wish to illustrate picture books, while others desire to do cover art, interior illustrations or graphic novels.

 

We ask that you make your selection based on the type of work you want to do and what you feel best matches your artistic style. Once you have made your selection, we would like you to develop a scene using animals that epitomize your main characters while keeping the familiarity of the story. The works can be used for website content, mailers, portfolio material, business cards . . . anything you wish.

 

Your options are:

                                    THE OLD WOMAN WHO LIVED IN A SHOE   or

 

                                    DR. JEKYLL & MR. HYDE

 

We will begin brainstorming about character development. The initial session is not a critique. It should serve to ignite your creative sparks and share a bit of dialogue about the ideas you have for your characters and overall scene.

 

Friday, October 15th  #1 ~ Character Sketches:  Once the first goal is established, we would like to have the first drafts of your characters rendered and ready for critique by Friday, October 15th.

 

Friday, November 19th  #2  ~ First Look: During this phase, we would like to see a rough draft rendering of your characters positioned into your scene. In this session we will look at characters, composition, range of emotion and story telling. We will diplomatically help each other work through any trouble spots that may need addressing.

 

Friday, December 17th  #3 ~ Critique Day For Completed Artwork: By this date,  illustrators should have a completed full color rendering of the entire scene to present for group critique. If the work is not completed, we ask that you post your work on the next critique day which will be scheduled accordingly.

 

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Hey all, trying to be in keeping with critique meetings, there will be changes to the scheduled dates. Now, is a great time to brainstorm and get some ideas down for your characters.

Speaking of that, my 11 year old daughter and I were discussing the project last night, talking about which animals would best suit the stories. She told me that rabbits would really work for "There Was An Old Woman Who Lived In A Shoe". After I gave it a brief second of thought, I realized how clever she was . . . rabbits generally have a lot, a whole lot of youngin's. Fun concept . . . It was nice to consult with her . . . but I still may use something else I have in mind . . . hope you all have fun brainstorming as well.
The change in the deadline dates are now reflected in the schedule posted above. It is now correct. If you are unable to attend a critique meeting or would prefer to participate online . . . or both, the schedule is in keeping with the group meetings.
I have been remembering when we lived on the desert and my children were small. We always had to look out for scorpians in thier shoes or clothes. Mice were a problem too, and perhaps a little more appealing than a scorpian, or even spiders. But, I guess it is all in how they are rendered. What do you all think??
Hi Judy,
I think mice are very expressive and was thinking about them myself. Field mice in boots? House mice in shoes? Rats in a shoe factory? Hmmmmm....??

Judy Pfeifer said:
I have been remembering when we lived on the desert and my children were small. We always had to look out for scorpians in thier shoes or clothes. Mice were a problem too, and perhaps a little more appealing than a scorpian, or even spiders. But, I guess it is all in how they are rendered. What do you all think??
Hi Judy and Donna. Mice, out of the lot you mentioned, seem to be appropriate. A lot depends on the rendering, but sometimes subject matter could provoke certain reactions. Albeit, Janell Cannon, has conquered many a subject successfully, Stella Luna the bat, Verdi, a snake and Crickwing, etc, she has a way of making everything beautiful. So, it can be done.

I think mice work well because, like rabbits, they are known for having many offspring.

Nice thoughts.
Cynthia Kremsner said:
Hi Judy and Donna. Mice, out of the lot you mentioned, seem to be appropriate. A lot depends on the rendering, but sometimes subject matter could provoke certain reactions. Albeit, Janell Cannon, has conquered many a subject successfully, Stella Luna the bat, Verdi, a snake and Crickwing, etc, she has a way of making everything beautiful. So, it can be done.

I think mice work well because, like rabbits, they are known for having many offspring.

Nice thoughts.
I will have to research your reference, Cindy. I always do like to go for something a little more unconventional if possible. But, hey...ya gotta consider your audience. Let's think though about the Shrek character...monsters recreating the whole Beauty and The Beast story?? The "Caroline" character? Maybe scorpians and spiders are not so unconventional in these days of mug warts, wizards and vampires after all. Hmm...maybe I should be doing Dr. Jekle and Mr Hyde??? But, I still do love the mice in the shoe you guys. Love your input!

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